Short courses

Programme Short Courses – Monday June 17, 2019

08:40-08:45

Welcome

Ludo Vermeeren, SCK•CEN, Belgium (Short Course Chair)

Igor Lengar, JSI, Slovenia (Short Course Co-chair)
08:45-08:55

Introduction by the participants

All participants
08:55-10:25

Radiation detection and measurement methods

Abdallah Lyoussi, CEA/INSTN, France
10:25-10:40

Coffee break


10:40-11:40

Hands-on session on Silicon Photomultipliers

Massimo Morichi, CAEN, Italy
11:40-12:40

Advanced diagnostic concepts for fusion reactors

Jean-Marc Layet, Aix-Marseille University, France
12:40-13:40

Lunch break


13:40-14:40

Semiconductor detector studies by Transient Current Technique

Gregor Kramberger, JSI, Slovenia
14:40-15:40

A direction sensitive gamma camera

Matjaz Vencelj, JSI, Slovenia
15:40-15:55

Coffee break


15:55-16:55

Hands-on session on Positron Emission Tomography

Massimo Morichi, CAEN, Italy
16:55-17:55

Optional examination


18:10-

Proclamation

Participants to the short courses have the opportunity to perform a multiple choice test. This test will take place immediately after the courses on Monday June 17, from 16:45 until 17:45.

Proclamation and the official awarding of the certificates is planned later that evening at 18.00 h. These certificates can be used for obtaining ECTS credits at the participants’ university.

Participants to the short courses who decide not to perform the examination will receive a certificate of attendance.



 

Module 1:

 


Radiation detection and measurement methods

Prof. Abdallah Lyoussi, CEA/INSTN, France


General Chair: Prof. dr. Abdallah Lyoussi, CEA, France


Summary of the training module


Starting from the physical principles, the course will discuss the performances and the limitations of various radiation detectors that can be used in nuclear reactors and in the subsequent stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. Two specific applications will illustrate the practical applications of the detection techniques: neutron dosimetry in fission reactors and nuclear monitoring of the fuel cycle (passive and active neutron measurements, sensing via photo fission, coupling of measurements and combined interpretation).

The course will be structured as follows:


  1. Interaction of radiation with matter

  2. Physical principles of radiation detectors

    • (a) Gas-filled detectors

    • (b) Scintillation detectors

    • (c) Solid-state detectors (semiconductor, diamond, TLD)

    • (c) Activation detectors


Short CV

Prof. Dr. Abdallah Lyoussi was born in Fes, Morocco in 1965. He received his MSc in nuclear physics from Fes University in 1988 and MSc in Nuclear Engineering from French institute of nuclear sciences and technologies (INSTN) in 1990. In 1994 he got his PhD in nuclear physics from Blaise Pascal University (Clermont-Ferrand, France) and his advanced graduation in research supervising activities (HDR) in 2002. He has worked on non-destructive measurement methods such as photofission interrogation, neutron interrogation by using different kinds of detectors, electronics, data acquisition systems and advanced particles production machine like LINAC; neutron generators, X tubes. He developed, patented and published various works and innovative advanced nuclear measurement methodologies. Abdallah Lyoussi is Professor at INSTN and Aix-Marseille University where he cochairs a master on “Instrumentation & Measurements in Harsh Media”. He is currently working at CEA (French Atomic & Alternative Energies) Cadarache research centre as researcher in physics and international expert in nuclear measurement. Finally, since May 2010, Abdallah Lyoussi is scientific CEA chair of a new common instrumentation and measurement Lab. called LIMMEX between CEA and Aix-Marseille University.


 

 




 

Module 2:

 


Hands-on session: Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), a state-of the art sensor to explore the quantum world

Dr. Massimo Morichi, CCAEN SYS & CAEN S.p.A.

and

Dr. Erica Fanchini, CAEN S.p.A.

Summary of the training module

Exploring the quantum nature of phenomena is one of the most exiting experiences a physics student can live. What is being proposed here has to do with light quanta, radioactive decays (beta and gamma rays) and cosmic rays. The experiments address the essence of the phenomenon as well as exemplary illustrations of their use in medical imaging and industry, complemented by basic and advanced statistical exercises.
The set-ups are all based on Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) state-of-the-art sensors of light with single photon sensitivity and unprecedented photon number capability. In the field of light sensing and related appliances and instrumentation, SiPM are expected to have the same impact the transistor had: well beyond the replacement of thermoionic valves, it triggered a revolution opening up new and unforeseen perspectives. As a consequence, it is quite natural to get started with activities aimed to introduce the student to the knowledge of the features of this class of sensors.

Dr. Massimo Morichi, CCAEN SYS & CAEN S.p.A.

Dr. Massimo Morichi

At present, Massimo Morichi is leading the CAEN Group towards the industrial nuclear field, developing instrumentation technologies, nuclear measuring systems and solutions in the areas of Fuel Cycle, Reactors and Safeguards applications.

Massimo has more than 25 years’ experience in management, research, engineering, product & program management. In 2005 was appointed VP R&D CTO of the AREVA BU Nuclear Measurements (CANBERRA Inc. in US) and in March 2011 took the responsibility in Japan of the AREVA Fukushima Project as WG Leader of the site remediation and mitigation plan.

Upon graduation in “Nuclear Engineering”, he specialized in Reactor Core Physics and neutron simulation & modelling (ENEA Dipartimento Reattori Veloci). He participates to PEC studies on reactivity transient analysis Mr. Morichi he’s Doctor in Nuclear Physics from “La Sapienza” University of Rome (Italy). Mr. Morichi is a certified AREVA international Senior Expert (level 2) on Instrumentation, Nuclear Measurements and Safety & Protection and he’s a Certified Radiation Protection Expert: n.1474.

He is member of several scientific Committees; Visiting Committee member of IRSN (Institute for Nuclear Radiation Safety) and has been Board member of the Nuclear Experimental Reactor J. Horowitz.


Dr. Erica Fanchini


Dr. Erica Fanchini, CAEN S.p.A.

PhD in Physics, is currently working at CAEN as Product Manager involved in the homeland security field and project manager of R&D grants.

She got her PhD at the Milano-Bicocca University 2011 with a thesis on the LHCb experiment. He got a post-doctoral fellowship for the Université Joseph Fourier (France) and two at the INFN (Italy) working on fundamental physics experiments and a security application.

After her post-doctoral experience, she joined CAEN in 2017 thanks to her relevant experience in the characterization and calibration of equipment used to detect ionizing radiations and on MonteCarlo software modeling of the radiation detection systems. 




 




 

Module 3:

 


Advanced diagnostic concepts for fusion reactors

Prof. Jean-Marc Layet, Aix-Marseille University, France

Prof. Jean-Marc Layet, Aix-Marseille University, France

Summary of the training module

Development of diagnostics is crucial in fusion devices. They provide the measurements required for machine protection, plasma control and physics studies.

Due to the particular characteristics of fusion plasmas (hot plasma, plasma-wall interactions,..), diagnostics are based on a large variety of physical processes. The complexity of fusion reactors has motivated the development of various kinds of plasma diagnostics using the most advanced technologies. The aim of this conference is to give an introduction into the field of plasma diagnostics (including plasma-wall interaction) taken into account the harsh environment and unexplored “burning plasma” conditions of the next generation of fusion reactors (ITER); we will show that the development and integration of plasma diagnostics in ITER is a major challenge.

Short CV

Development of diagnostics is crucial in fusion devices. They provide the measurements required for machine protection, plasma control and physics studies.

Prof. Jean-Marc Layet was born in Marseille in 1952. He is professor at the Aix-Marseille University. He is also vice-president of this University and member of the Scientific Council. He is director of the “Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires” (University – CNRS). He set up a collaboration with CEA Cadarache (Institut de Recherche en Fusion Magnétique, Tore-Supra) to study plasma-wall interactions. His main topics of interest are: Plasma physics, Ion sources, Surface physics, Electrons spectroscopies and Near field microscopy.



 




 

Module 4:

 


Semiconductor detector studies by Transient Current Technique

Dr. Gregor Kramberger, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Dr. Gregor Kramberger, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia


Summary of the training module

Understanding the signal formation in semiconductor detectors is fundamental for their use in various applications particularly in harshest radiation environments, such as high energy physics experiments and fusion reactors. The transient current techniques (TCT) are one of the most widely used techniques to characterize semiconductor detector and are fundamental tool for understanding the changes of detector performance after irradiations. TCT exploits short laser pulse for creation of localized ionization (free carriers) in semiconductor detectors. The motion of these non-equilibrium carriers in electric field induces currents in electrodes, which when properly analysed reveal most important detector properties.

The course will be structured as follows:


 

  • basics of semiconductor particle detectors

  • radiation damage effects

  • TCT as the tool to investigate properties of these detectors (different modalities, analysis methods)

  • demonstration of using portable TCT system on different semiconductor detectors

Short CV

Dr. Gregor Kramberger (1971) received his MSc in physics in 1995 and his PhD in 2001, both from Ljubljana University. The main topic of his research was radiation effects on operation of semiconductor detectors used in high energy physics experiments. He was a research-fellow at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY (2001-2003) where he worked on ZEUS experiment at HERA collider. After that he joined Jožef Stefan Institute (2004-) and works on radiation hardness of silicon and diamond particle detectors, as well as dosimeters, for the high luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. He is an active member of ATLAS collaboration and has worked on different sub-detectors including the leading role for Radiation monitor detector at ATLAS experiment. He was convener of several research lines within CERN-RD50 collaboration (Radiation hard semiconductor devices for very high luminosity colliders) and currently serves as the collaboration board chair. He played a major role in setting up semiconductor characterization laboratory at Jožef Stefan Institute and pioneered several novel measurement techniques and detector characterization analysis methods. One of them is Scanning Transient Current Technique (2006) which led to founding of a successful JSI spin-out company Particulars Ltd. (2013) for production of these systems.



 



 

Module 5:

 


A direction sensitive gamma camera

Dr. Matjaž Vencelj, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Dr. Matjaž Vencelj, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia


Summary of the training module

Measuring the direction of flight of energetic ionizing photons is an extremely diverse topic, ranging from X-ray space telescopes, through reaction kinematic reconstruction in fundamental nuclear and particle physics experiments, to medical imaging techniques, contamination localization techniques in the nuclear industry, and homeland security applications. Approaches differ significantly as well, utilizing coded aperture masks, rotating obstructions, Compton imaging techniques and “camera obscura” geometries coupled with positionally sensitive detectors, in seemingly endless variations. The module will take a stroll through the physics fundamentals of all of the above approaches, commenting on their specific peculiarities and readout requirements. At the end, we will try to define a universal sensitivity parametrization for all such devices, with a practical experimental illustration.


Short CV

Dr. Matjaž Vencelj (1975) received his BSc in physics in 1999, his MSc in 2002 and his PhD in 2006, all from the University of Ljubljana, on experimental nuclear structure studies performed at the Argonne Natl. Lab. and the Berkeley Natl. Lab. in the USA. During 2005-2007, he was a research fellow at the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut of the University of Groningen, and the Chief Scientific Officer at Hi-Light Optoelectronics Ltd., both in Holland, working on the design of an angular-sensitive antineutrino antenna grid and on the instrumentation for the upcoming GSI/FAIR facility of Darmstadt, Germany. Back in
Ljubljana, he is with the Jožef Stefan Institute (2007-) as a scientific associate, focusing in radiation detection hardware design and readout algorithm optimization, esp. within the NUSTAR collaboration of the FAIR/GSI community, as well as for the various medical and industrial niches. He continues teaching various radiation detection, readout and electronics courses at the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics of Ljubljana University and at the Jožef Stefan International Postgraduate School. He is a co-founder and the managing director of AISense Ltd. (2014-), manufacturing the market’s first hand-held device to measure the dominant direction of the gamma-ray field in real time.



 



 

Module 6:

 


Hands-on session: Nuclear Imaging – PET

Dr. Massimo Morichi, CCAEN SYS & CAEN S.p.A.

and

Dr. Erica Fanchini, CAEN S.p.A.

Summary of the training module

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner is the state-of-the-art medical imaging system, capable of providing detailed functional information of physiological processes inside the human body. PET represents a beautiful example of integration of skills and competences from medicine, nuclear chemistry, physics and information technology. The SP5700-EasyPET opens the possibility of teaching by doing the basics behind PET imaging, which is certainly an asset to high-level educational laboratories. The experiments proposed in this section are performed by using the CAEN portable didactic PET system, developed by University of Aveiro (PT), and by using the CAEN Desktop Digitizer DT5720A.

Dr. Massimo Morichi, CCAEN SYS & CAEN S.p.A.

Dr. Massimo Morichi

At present, Massimo Morichi is leading the CAEN Group towards the industrial nuclear field, developing instrumentation technologies, nuclear measuring systems and solutions in the areas of Fuel Cycle, Reactors and Safeguards applications.

Massimo has more than 25 years’ experience in management, research, engineering, product & program management. In 2005 was appointed VP R&D CTO of the AREVA BU Nuclear Measurements (CANBERRA Inc. in US) and in March 2011 took the responsibility in Japan of the AREVA Fukushima Project as WG Leader of the site remediation and mitigation plan.

Upon graduation in “Nuclear Engineering”, he specialized in Reactor Core Physics and neutron simulation & modelling (ENEA Dipartimento Reattori Veloci). He participates to PEC studies on reactivity transient analysis Mr. Morichi he’s Doctor in Nuclear Physics from “La Sapienza” University of Rome (Italy). Mr. Morichi is a certified AREVA international Senior Expert (level 2) on Instrumentation, Nuclear Measurements and Safety & Protection and he’s a Certified Radiation Protection Expert: n.1474.

He is member of several scientific Committees; Visiting Committee member of IRSN (Institute for Nuclear Radiation Safety) and has been Board member of the Nuclear Experimental Reactor J. Horowitz.


Dr. Erica Fanchini


Dr. Erica Fanchini, CAEN S.p.A.

PhD in Physics, is currently working at CAEN as Product Manager involved in the homeland security field and project manager of R&D grants.

She got her PhD at the Milano-Bicocca University 2011 with a thesis on the LHCb experiment. He got a post-doctoral fellowship for the Université Joseph Fourier (France) and two at the INFN (Italy) working on fundamental physics experiments and a security application.

After her post-doctoral experience, she joined CAEN in 2017 thanks to her relevant experience in the characterization and calibration of equipment used to detect ionizing radiations and on MonteCarlo software modeling of the radiation detection systems.